Articles tagged with Terror Bird

Ringing in my ear

Sick of the photo shoot
Here’s some more goth-y pop from Vancouver’s Terror Bird. Below you can listen to the awesomely minimal “Dumb Sick,” which buries its droning synths below a driving beat and haunting, double-tracked vocals. It’s ominously catchy, and manages to achieve a lot with very little.

I reviewed Terror Bird’s album Human Culture for the Georgia Straight. The rest of the album is just as great as this song, so I highly recommend picking it up.


 
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I’m glad that you’re not mine

The ashtray is not for decoration
I’m a little confused about what is going on with Terror Bird right now. For as long as I’ve known, the band has been a two-piece from Vancouver. But MySpace now says that Terror Bird is a three-piece from Los Angeles. And before you say anything, I’m definitely at the right MySpace page.

What I’m not confused about is that Terror Bird has a new album out, Human Culture. Here’s “We Were Monsters,” a synth-spiked pop rocker that’s a lot more sprightly than what I’ve heard from the band in the past. There’s still a wash of haunting reverb and some bleak, lovelorn lyrics, but this isn’t really goth pop (which is what I’ve always called the group before).

MP3: “We Were Monsters”
 
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In the mist and the rain

Finally settling the debate over who is taller
Listening to Terror Bird, you’d never guess that the group is made up of the same members as Vancouver fuzz punks Modern Creatures (who I’ve blogged about before). A far cry from the low-end assault of their other band, Nikki Never and Jeremiah Haywood swap up their basses for synthesizers, opting for a slow-burning sound that’s more creepy than it is aggressive.

“Cemetaries” (spell check!) appears on Terror Bird’s self-titled LP, which is due out this spring via Night People/ADAGIO 830. It’s an addictive new wave throwback, with sparse keyboard lines interweaving over a steadily ticking electro beat. Never’s ghostly vocals are soaked in ominous reverb, meaning that lines like “We should be walking together” seem more threatening than romantic.

MP3: “Cemetaries”
 
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