Articles tagged with Daniel Romano

Daniel Romano – “The Middle Child”

Daniel Romano
I haven’t listened to much folk and country in the last couple of years, but Daniel Romano‘s “The Middle Child” is undeniably brilliant. It’s a tear-in-beer heartbreaker based on an apparently real story about a kid who was put up for adoption by a women who decided to keep her other two children.

I included Romano’s upcoming LP, Come Cry with Me, in the Exclaim! list of the year’s most anticipated Canadian albums. The disc is out on January 22.


 
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It’s so easy to write a losing song

Cigarettes and alcohol, but no shoes
How much does Attack in Black/Daniel, Fred & Julie songwriter Daniel Romano hate the music industry? This much: his solo debut contains not one but two anti-industry rants which are called “Workin’ for the Music Man” and “Workin’ for the Music Man Pt. 2.” Oh yeah, the album is called Workin’ for the Music Man too.

On the folk rocking single “A Losing Song,” Romano appears to be in the grips of a career crisis, asking, “Why should I even play the chords? / Why should I even make a sound?” Sorry Daniel, I don’t have an answer for you. But the pedal steel leads and falsetto chorus sure are pretty.

MP3: “A Losing Song”
 
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I’ve been called a runner

Even the picture is lo-fi
It’s Polaris season and, as I’ve previously discussed, I’ve been catching up on some albums I missed over the past twelve months. Over the weekend, I took a tip from Bryan at Herohill and checked out the self-titled LP by Daniel, Fred & Julie (aka Attack in Black‘s Daniel Romano, Calm Down It’s Monday‘s Fred Squire and ex-Eric’s Trip songstress Julie Doiron).

Wow. I initially wasn’t convinced if an album of traditional folk songs with only two original compositions could be considered as a Polaris contender, but I’m pleased to report that I was totally wrong. Recorded in a garage with no overdubs of edits, it’s a gorgeous collection of skeletal folk and spooky murder ballads. With stunning three-part harmonies and bare-bones arrangements that often consist of nothing other than a strummed acoustic guitar, it’s the kind of timeless album that could have been recorded any time in the last 70 years.

“Runner” is one of the album’s two originals. Written by Daniel and sung by Fred, it’s a tale of a rambling man that’s propelled by dense minor-key arpeggios before slowing to a waltz-time coda. Want proof of the album’s lo-fi authenticity? Listen to the car that drives past at around 1:48.

MP3: “Runner”
 
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